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Bite-sized screencasts on iOS and Mac development.

Displaying Episode 265 - 288 of 409 in total
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#145
In this episode we continue our building of a share extension. This time we focus on performing the actual upload in the background, sharing a background session with our application through the App Group capability.
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#144
In this episode we create an application and share extension that lets us post to the Imgur API. We use a Framework to share API code between application and extension, and we leverage App Groups so that background sessions transfer across both as well.
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#143
In this episode we cover a horribly named, yet fairly powerful concept called flat map. We'll use this technique to solve the problem we discovered last time dealing with Result<T> and having to use a switch statement everywhere.
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#142
In this episode I talk about the pattern of communicating errors in Cocoa and how it can be improved by leveraging features in Swift. By introducing a Result type that is generic and applies to any type, it appears useful, however we run into some cumbersome use cases that will require further discussion.
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#141
In this episode we use UIKit Dynamics to create something fun: Rope! By attaching many segments together with attachments, we can simulate the physics of a rope. We also discover the best way to move an object on the screen in conjunction with existing attachments.
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#140
In this episode we take another look at UIKit Dynamics, this time focusing on UIAttachmentBehavior, which allows you to create springs between elements to fix them in place or make them swing.
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#139
One of iOS 8's more powerful new features is App Extensions. With extensions we have a whole new range of possibilities. In this episode we'll focus on the Today Extension, which is a way to add a widget to Notification Center for quick access.
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#138
Finally iOS 8 and Xcode 6 are available and out of NDA and we can cover them on NSScreencast. There are tons of new features to cover, so today I'm just going to pick one: IBDesignable. With IBDesignable you can live preview your custom views so you don't have to stare at empty gray boxes in Interface Builder anymore. Interface Builder just got way more useful!
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#137
In this episode we explore the powerful UIKit Dynamics that was introduced with iOS 7. With Dynamics you can simulate real world interactions between your views. We'll go over the basics of collision, gravity, rigid bounds, and leave off with an example of why you shouldn't use it to make games.
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#136
In this episode we'll attempt to create the board for the game Connect Four. We'll leverage what we've learned about auto layout and create the connect four board constraints, then we'll draw the view. We have to draw it filled with a bunch of holes, so that we can see objects passing behind it. Using Core Graphics and clipping paths we can accomplish this effect.
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#135
What good is a static layout? When specifying layout using constraints, we still need to provide transitions and other animations in our interfaces. We can do this quite easily by just animating between different sets of constraints.
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#134
In this episode we explore Apple's Visual Format Language for building Auto Layout Constraints. While a bit strange at first glance, the Visual Format Language can really convey a lot of layout information in just a few characters in comparison to the manual building of NSLayoutConstraints can be.
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#133
In this episode we take a look at how to set up auto layout constraints in code, rather than with Interface Builder / Storyboards. Whether you prefer to work in code or storyboards to lay you user interfaces, often times setting things up in code is required. You'll see how to use NSLayoutConstraint to fully specify a layout, and hopefully understand a bit more about how auto layout works.
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#132
Realm is a new project that aims to replace Core Data and even SQLite for mobile app persistent storage needs. While an ambitious goal, I like seeing alternatives in this area, as Core Data is not always my favorite framework. In this episode we'll add Realm to a project and store a few rudimentary objects. We'll also see a quick way to query the data in the "realm".
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#131
In this episode we wrap up our JSON parsing exploration in Swift by extending the decoding to work with arrays. Doing so cleans up the extraction code significantly.
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#130
In this episode we attempt to write a more idiomatic JSON Parsing framework leveraging Swift. To accomplish this we'll lean heavily on Swift's powerful enum features and apply a couple of custom operators to clean up syntax and reduce redundant code.
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#129
Parsing JSON (which provides no contracts or type guarantees) can be difficult and tedious in Swift. Many of the problems you are forced to deal with were easier to ignore in Objective-C, but that doesn't mean they weren't present. In this episode we'll take a look at a very manual approach to mapping from a JSON response to a Swift type.
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#128
In this episode we take a look at the NSURLSession API from a Swift perspective. We create a class to fetch JSON from an API, and along the way see lazy properties and type aliases.
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#127
One of Swift's powerful features is the ability to define custom operators. In this episode we take a look at two examples of custom operators, one for easy regular expression matching, and another for computing the dot product between two vectors.
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#126
Continuing on with our Swift exploration, we focus this time on Swift classes. We talk about initializers, inheritance, protocols, type inspection, and more.
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#125
In this episode we take a first look at Apple's brand new programming language Swift.
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#124
In this episode we delve into the wonderful Objective-C runtime in order to replace method implementations with our own. Using this technique we can add or change behavior to existing classes, which can be extremely useful for Aspect Oriented Programming (logging/benchmarking), or analytics.
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#123
In this episode I take a look at a lightweight network library called STHTTPRequst. Specifically I like two features it provides: easy curl logging of outgoing requests, and a test response queue for performing unit tests against canned responses. Whether or not you want to use this library, there are some good things to learn here.
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#122
In this episode I cover Facebook's new, shiny animation framework called Pop. With it we explore spring & decay animations that can make your apps feel more alive.