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Showing episodes 25 - 48 of 505 in total
  • #481

    This is a discussion and code overview of another implementation of mapping models using key paths with a special guest, Antoine van der Lee! In this episode we talk about his initial goals and constraints, and some of the design tradeoffs he made while designing a solution that would give him a bidirectional mapping between Core Data entities and other model types.

  • #480

    Ever wanted to translate from one type to another, for instance mapping from network models to core data objects? In this episode we will explore how to leverage Swift Keypaths to create a mapping between models. Along the way we'll run into a limitation of key paths and then talk about how to work around it.

  • #479

    Layout in Code

    Working with NSAttributedStrings can be a bit cumbersome, and can present some challenges when you want to localize your strings. We can make things much easier to work with by leveraging the BonMot library, which provides a cleaner interface for styling strings, allows us to separate styling from the views and strings, and customize tags we can use to mix styles in the same string.

  • #478

    Layout in Code

    Sometimes our text contains links that should be styled differently and react to taps so a URL can be opened in a web browser. While we can use a UILabel to detect and style links, they don't respond to touches. Let's see how we can leverage UITextView instead to handle links in NSAttribtedStrings.

  • #477

    Layout in Code

    To work with styled text we'll use NSAttributedStrings, which allow us to apply styles to ranges of text. Doing this in code is a bit more cumbersome than in storyboards, but allows us to control things like font size, color, style, kerning, line spacing and more.

  • #476

    Layout in Code

    The built-in way of adding constraints in code requires quite a bit of code and is a bit cumbersome to write. I believe that we should aim to reduce friction when writing code like this to make it easier to add new views and change your layout. SnapKit is a pretty useful dependency that gives you a DSL for making autolayout constraints. In this episode we'll integrate SnapKit into the project and simplify our existing layout code.

  • #475

    Layout in Code

    If you look at our view controller now, it is full of code that mostly is dealing with constraints, subviews, and overall layout. This is really the job of the view. In this episode we will extract this into a new view class. We'll also introduce a reusable base class that will handle the required view initializer dance for us, making the job of creating custom view classes a bit easier.

  • #474

    Layout in Code

    One really useful UIView subclass I generally have on all my projects is a simple GradientView. You give it two colors and optionally some location values and it draws a gradient from top to bottom. In this episode we build this so that we can integrate a fade to black effect to overlay on top of the background image.

  • #473

    Layout in Code

    In this episode we will see how we can leverage SwiftUI's live previews even if we aren't using SwiftUI and even if our deployment target is less than iOS 13! We'll cover previewing our view controllers and using that to give us rapid feedback on our layout as we work.

  • #472

    Layout in Code

    When working on a project that doesn't use Storyboards, we have to create our window and root view controller manually. iOS 13 introduced the concept of Scene Delegates, which change how this is typically set up. In this episode we will review how to set up a new project, remove the storyboard references, and set up the window and root view controller in code.

  • #471

    Imagine you're building an app that will consume an API, however the API is not ready yet. The server team has given you some sample responses as JSON files you can use to start working against. In this episode we'll examine a useful technique of registering a custom URLProtocol for intercepting and handling network requests. We can use this fake server to continue building out our network infrastructure without being dependent on the backend API.

  • #470

    One of the quickest ways for an app to give some personality and branding is to customize the type of buttons in the app. Out of the box iOS gives us a rather uninspiring blue label that is known to be a button, but it is common for apps to have their own button design. In this episode we will take a stylized button design from Dribbble and implement it as a custom component. We'll build it in a playground so we can see our work quickly, and we'll create custom previews (similar to SwiftUI) for viewing multiple states of the button at the same time.

  • #469

    Command Line Swift

    Now that we have some streaming output from the ffmpeg process, we can take this and create a custom progress bar. Since this could useful in other utilities we can create it as a separate Swift package and import it using a local file reference.

  • #468

    Command Line Swift

    When dealing with long running tasks it would be nice to be able to gather output as the task runs and not hang until the entire process is done. In this episode we will extract some useful information out of ffprobe, so we can get the total number of frames in a video file, and then kick off ffmpeg to encode the video. We'll use the Subprocess package to provide a simpler interface over gathering output from a pipe as it is sent, rather than waiting for the end.

  • #467

    Command Line Swift

    I always like it when command line programs offer colored output, which helps to discern between various stages of output, highlight errors and other important information. This is done with ANSI color codes, which are a somewhat archaic technique, but we can implement a nice wrapper to make it easy to work with in Swift.

  • #466

    Command Line Swift

    In this episode we will launch other programs as sub processes and show how to capture its output.

  • #465

    Command Line Swift

    Working with files and folders with FileManager is cumbersome. Instead we'll lean on the excellent Files package from John Sundell.

  • #464

    Command Line Swift

    I use a collection of command line scripts that help me in the production of NSScreencast episodes. Most are written in Ruby, which is a language I know and love, and some are written in bash, which is... a language. I sometimes wonder what these scripts would look like if I were to write them in Swift. So in this new series I'm going to explore rewriting a script that I use to encode videos using Swift. In this episode we'll bring in the excellent Swift Argument Parser library and use it to give us a clean and consistent command line interface to start with.

  • #463

    Pigeon is an interesting and powerful library for SwiftUI and UIKit for fetching and caching data. In this episode we will explore the library and how we can use it to build a simple Star Wars Universe explorer app using the Star Wars Dev API.

  • #462

    Foundation has a wonderfully useful support for deal with measurements like distances, durations, temperatures and more in Swift. The Measurement class combines with a Unit type to constrain the measurements into their own domains. With this you can get functionality like conversion and addition. With MeasurementFormatter we can format these values for display in our UI based on the user's locale. In this episode we will explore how to use this API, how to extend the existing dimensions to add new measurement values, and how to create your own domain of measurements. For this we will model Throughput of Items in the game Factorio.

  • #461

    One of the benefits we can get by programming to protocols and leaving our concrete implementations isolated, is that we enable swapping out these dependencies for different ones for use during tests. Doing so will require us to restructure our app setup a bit so we can have a completely separate AppDelegate and SceneDelegate for use in testing. With this setup we can control the environment completely. We'll setup mock dependencies that we can verify that the interaction with these dependencies is as expected.

  • #460

    Managing dependencies can be a pain. Unless you're using shared instances accessible everywhere, you end up having to pass along dependencies from class to class. One strategy for decoupling your types from external dependencies is to create protocols and "inject" the actual concrete implementations at runtime. This enables you to test them easily and also isolates library-specific APIs from the rest of your application. This can make switching between libraries more feasible. In this episode we'll take a look at a library called Resolver that does this. Technically it implements Service Location rather than Dependency Injection, but the result is similar.

  • #459

    Working with Modern Collection Views

    Using Item Anchors we can position decoration views anchored to our layout items. This is could be used to outline or underline items, or in our case to add a little unread indicator badge to our items.

  • #458

    Working with Modern Collection Views

    Not every layout will be appropriate for every screen size. In this episode you'll see how you can use the layout environment when constructing your compositional layout to provide a more suitable layout for iPad.