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Bite-sized videos on iOS development.

The iOS landscape is large and changes often. With short, bite-sized videos released on a steady schedule, NSScreencast helps keep you continually up to date.

Up to date with Xcode 12 and iOS 14

We cover the latest and greatest to get you up to speed quickly.

UIKit, SwiftUI, and macOS

In our catalog you'll find a wide variety of topics and UI frameworks.

Swift Language

Increase your knowledge of the Swift language and take advantage of new Swift language features as they are developed.

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We don't want to waste your time. Most videos are between 10 and 20 minutes long.

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Have I mentioned lately how awesome NSScreencast is? No? Worth the subscription. Check it out if you’re an iOS developer. Or even if you’re not and you want an example of how to do coding screencasts well.

Got tired of dead-end googling so I checked to see if @NSScreencast had covered what I was looking for. Of course he had, 4 years ago. Should have checked there first.

One 13-minute episode of @NSScreencast just paid for the yearly subscription fee in amount of time saved. Do it.

Seriously great stuff even for seasoned developers. I’ve learned a good amount from Ben’s videos.

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Random PSA for iOS developers: @NSScreencast is a great resource, and worth every penny. It’s high quality, practical, and honest.

Can’t say enough good things about @NSScreencast There is gold in the Road Trip DJ Series.

I just reuppped my subscription to @NSScreencast. [An] indespensible resource if you’re into iOS or Mac Development.

Just finished @NSScreencast series on Modern CollectionViews. Strongly recommended. Programmatic UI, nicely structured code, easily approachable explanation style. 👌

Showing episodes 337 - 360 of 507 in total
  • #171

    In this episode we examine how we can leverage the NSDateComponents class to convert a set of individual date parts like month, day, year into an actual NSDate

  • #170

    In this episode we talk about a Swift testing framework called Quick. Quick offers a familiar BDD style syntax, some really friendly matchers, as well as support for testing asynchronous parts of our code. We'll use a Ninja class as our example, testing initialization, equality, and an asynchronous method.

  • #169

    Road Trip DJ

    In this episode we wrap up our long Road Trip DJ Series. We resume testing on the device, uncovering and fixing an auto-layout issue, working with the music players events to keep our UI in sync, implementing a song progress indicator and implementing scrubbing. Phew!

  • #168

    Road Trip DJ

    In this episode we fix up the scrollbar, handle taps and update the active track, as well as adding a background color to the active row.

  • #167

    Road Trip DJ

    In this episode I do some deep auto-layout constraint debugging with Reveal, and discuss how to make our header resize based on the device we're running on.

  • #166

    Road Trip DJ

    In this episode I address the usability concerns of our toolbar buttons. I removed the bar button item spacing elements and instead use auto layout to control the size of the buttons. We also add a visual indicator of how wide each button is when you tap it, and fix the play/pause state of the middle button.

  • #165

    Road Trip DJ

    In this episode we adapt MPMediaItem to our PlaylistItem protocol and fix some issues related to running on the device. We add play/pause functionality, and discuss the issue of hit area on our toolbar buttons.

  • #164

    Road Trip DJ

    In this episode I fix a couple of bugs and fix the transition animation for the header view by leveraging UIView snapshotting.

  • #163

    Road Trip DJ

    In this episode we fix the playlist header at the top, first by a custom collection view layout, then by simply using a custom view at the top.

  • #162

    Road Trip DJ

    In this episode we wire up the next / previous track buttons and modify which track is currently shown in the header. We also encounter an unexpected issue when comparing signed and unsigned integers.

  • #161

    Road Trip DJ

    In this episode we make a custom collection view header to prominently display the currently playing track. We also fix up some auto layout issues from the last episode.

  • #160

    Road Trip DJ

    This time we work on the collection view layout and cells, along the way we create an abstraction of our media items to make development go a bit faster and to allow the app to display content in the simulator.

  • #159

    Road Trip DJ

    In this episode I put some custom icons in the player bar and convert this into a control that can be displayed in interface builder, complete with configurable spacing between buttons using Interface Builder.

  • #158

    Road Trip DJ

    Continuing our build out of Road Trip DJ, this time I focus on the music player, and keeping the play/pause button in sync on UIToolbar, which proves to be more difficult than it should be.

  • #157

    Road Trip DJ

    In this episode we continue Road Trip DJ and implement the media picker controller, talk about the different modes that in can operate in and how that affects the usability of this app. We also consider how we're going to build a playlist and keep appending items to it.

  • #156

    Road Trip DJ

    In this episode we start building an app from scratch called Road Trip DJ. The idea is the build a playlist of music on the fly while it is playing. This is an app I've wanted to build for a while and it serves as a good, small app we can build from start to finish.

  • #155

    Continuing from last week's episode, this time we talk about adding environment-specific settings in xcconfig files, have them pre-processed into the Info.plist, and also how to integrate this technique with CocoaPods.

  • #154

    In this episode we extract all of the settings from a standard iPhone project and move them over to a .xcconfig file for Xcode to use as a base for our projects. Doing so can make our configuration a bit more explicit, allow us to add comments on why certain settings are necessary, and also to put them under version control to make it easy to spot changes.

  • #153

    In this episode I cover configuring your Xcode project to conditionally include or exclude a feature, in case there is a feature you can't have in the App Store, or perhaps something that isn't quite ready yet.

  • #152

    In this episode I take a look at the basics of Cocoa Bindings. With Bindings you can have your controls on your view bound to properties on your controller or model, and even have controls bound to themselves. What would normally be a lot of manual plumbing code is handled for you automatically by bindings. To demonstrate, we build a live-updating temperature converter.

  • #151

    In this episode we take a look at CoreAnimation's easiest form of animation with CABasicAnimation. Using this class we can animate properties of a layer, such as frame, background color, paths for CAShapeLayer, and more. We also cover timing functions and how to make a transition between shapes a bit easier for the system to interpolate between.

  • #150

    In this first episode covering OS X development, I cover how to manage windows, window controllers and xibs with Objective-C and Swift. There are lots of options (and opinions) here, so we follow some advice from Mike Ash's blog post on the topic.

  • #149

    Have you ever wondered how bezier paths work? What are the control points, and how exactly do they affect the line? In this episode we'll build our own visualization of how a bézier path is constructed to help understand it better.

  • #148

    We continue our example of CoreImage CIFilters, this time showing how function composition can facilitate working with filters a bit more flexible and chainable. Starting with the imperative, method-based approach, then gradually building towards a pattern that allows us to easily build filters functionally, swapping out the order, and changing around input parameters.