Logomark
Top-notch video tutorials for developers.

Thousands of developers use NSScreencast to stay on top of iOS development.

Video Training for iOS Developers

The iOS landscape is large and changes often. With short, bite-sized videos released on a steady schedule, NSScreencast helps keep you continually up to date.

  • Quality content We stress the details. Each screencast is carefully produced in HD quality.
  • Team Plans Get access for your whole team. NSScreencast makes for great lunch & learns.
  • Any Device Stream on the web, or use one of our apps for  tv, iPhone, and iPad.
Keep up with iOS Development

NSScreencast has been releasing a new screencasts regularly for more than 6 years. With short videos you can learn a lot over time without a huge time commitment.

NSScreencast offers the largest collection of iOS development screencasts on the internet. With the range of videos that NSScreencast offers, there is something for people of every skill level.

Bite-sized screencasts on iOS and Mac development.

Shape
#453
First introduced in iOS 13, UICollectionViewCompositionalLayout is an amazing and powerful addition that gives you lots of flexibility when describing layouts. There are a few new types to get used to (namely sections, groups, and items) but they all work together allowing you to keep layout separate from your views and your data.
Shape
#452
With UITableView no longer being encouraged for use, we need to replace this behavior with UICollectionView. This is where UICollectionViewListLayout comes into play. Using this layout we can get the familiar table view appearance in plain and grouped styles (as well as additional styles to support sidebars on iPad and macOS). This includes support for sticky headers and footers, swipe actions, and other UITableView behaviors that we've come to rely on.
Shape
#451
In this episode we migrate our collection view to use the new cell registration API. Using this API we no longer need to cast dequeued cell types to our custom types. Instead, we set up the registration object with the cell type and the data we'll be passing to each cell. This further reduces the code we have to write in our datasource implementation and gives us more flexibility on how and where cells are configured.
Shape
#450
In this episode we review the basic example app and start setting up our collection view in code. We start with the basic flow layout which is most common. Later we'll refactor this to use the newer style, but this episode introduces the series and sets up the foundation we'll build upon.
Shape
#445
With the introduction of LazyVGrid and LazyHGrid In iOS 14 we now have access to much more powerful grid-based layouts in SwiftUI. In this episode We will examine the different types of layouts we can accomplish with flexible, fixed, and adaptive sizing for our rows and columns. We'll look at how animations work between different layouts, and how to consider larger screen sizes.
Shape
#444
A few episodes back we covered how to wrap a UIActivityIndicatorView to show loading progress in SwiftUI. Now in iOS 14 this is built in. In this episode we'll cover the various styles, how to hook it up to a Progress instance, and how to create your own custom progress visualizations.
Shape
#443
iOS 14 Beta is now available and one of the new features is Lazy stacks. With a normal stack, all the layout happened at once, which meant poor performance for large lists of content, grids, etc. With Lazy stacks the views are only created when they first come on screen, greatly increasing the usefulness of stacks for large or infinite collections of content.
Shape
#417
Before Swift 5 we used to write our own Result type to contain a value or an error (but never both). A lot of 3rd party libraries brought along their own as well. Then Swift 5 came and brought us Result. Not only is it slightly different than the ones we might be familiar with, Swift's Result type also has some useful functionality up its sleeve.
Shape
#406
Sometimes we need to create variants of our icons. This can be done by using template images and using a UIImageView with a tintColor change, however sometimes this isn't feasible. We can use our icons along with a mask to create new images of whatever color we want. In this episode we'll use UIGraphicsImageRenderer to quickly draw a new dimmed image for a highlighted button state.
Shape
#400
Attaching gestures works quite a bit differently in SwiftUI than in UIKit. In this episode we will look at the @DragGesture property wrapper and how we can use gestures to update custom state that we can then use to transform our UI.
Shape
#399
SwiftUI's declarative nature makes building UIs incredibly easy. In this episode we will build a wallet UI with cards. We will create a CardView so we can reuse it in multiple places. Then we will use transforms to alter it's size and position. Finally we will see how declarative animations work as we expand the cards apart.
Shape
#397
Now that we've seen a taste of SwiftUI, let's dive into a real example and build an app. We'll have a first look at @State variables we can use to creating a binding between our state and our UI, and we'll run into a few puzzling errors and see how we can coax Xcode into giving us the right error message.
Shape
#396
Back from WWDC 19 and blown away by the announcements. There's a lot to cover, but we'll start by digging into the most exciting announcement: SwiftUI. This is going to change everything...
Shape
#367
Working with dates is a task that is universally applicable to Swift developers. Particularly when dealing with an API, dates can arrive in all shapes and sizes. We‘ll examine some of the common ones such as ISO 8601, show how to parse these formats into Date instances, and how to use DateFormatter to display them back again as a string. We‘ll also cover the importance of using en_US_POSIX and honoring the user‘s Locale when displaying dates.
Shape
#356
In this episode we configure our iOS app to receive push notifications, adding the OneSignal SDK to our project, configuring the Notification Service extension, and testing it out on a real device.
Shape
#355
In this episode we look at how to generate a certification for adding push notification support for your app, using OneSignal as our push notification provider
Shape
#319
In this episode we will setup iTerm2, profiles, custom color schemes, and fonts.
Shape
#318
In this episode we look at some of the basic system preferences on macOS High Sierra. We set up the Dock, Keyboard shortcuts, and show how to customize key repeat timing outside of the preferences window.
Shape
#309
UITableView can support scrolling through many rows of data, however fetching large amounts of remote data can slow down your app, use up too much memory, and bog down your web server. This is all wasteful if users aren‘t ever going to scroll down that far. In this episode you‘ll learn how to perform automatic UITableView pagination using an easy technique.
Shape
#259
In order to use CloudKit to read or write private data (or to write in the public database) the user will have to be signed in to iCloud on their device. If they are not, they'll not have a great experience, and things won't work. In this episode we'll check the account status before trying to save a record in CloudKit. We'll also respond to the notification to know when the user's account status has changed so we can react accordingly.
Shape
#258
The first episode in a new series on CloudKit, here we see how to setup our project to use CloudKit as well as how to create and save our first record.
Shape
#248
In this episode I am joined by Soroush Khanlou. Together we pair up to implement the Poker Hands Kata. We start off by parsing the raw string input into structured types, complete with tests.
Shape
#191
In this free episode, we take a look at a core Swift 2 feature: Optionals. Unlike Objective-C, where nil is considered a no-op, in Swift nil is specifically recognized by the compiler, which forces you to handle cases where nil might be present in a variable.
Shape
#189
In this free episode, Ben explores Swift 2 functions, how argument labels work, returning tuples, the guard clause, as well as extending behavior on core types.