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Bite-sized videos on iOS development.

The iOS landscape is large and changes often. With short, bite-sized videos released on a steady schedule, NSScreencast helps keep you continually up to date.

Up to date with Xcode 12 and iOS 14

We cover the latest and greatest to get you up to speed quickly.

UIKit, SwiftUI, and macOS

In our catalog you'll find a wide variety of topics and UI frameworks.

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Showing episodes 457 - 480 of 504 in total
  • #48

    In this episode we examine Xcode's code snippets feature and how it can speed up your day to day development. We also take a look at a handy gem for easily installing code snippets you've found online.

  • #47

    Detecting touches used to be a chore. Thanks to the UIGestureRecognizer family of classes, detecting touches & gestures is a breeze. In this episode we implement a Photo Table where you can add photos, move them around, as well as pinch & rotate.

  • #46

    In this episode we dive into UICollectionView for displaying ... collections of views. We start by looking at how to tweak the builtin UICollectionViewFlowLayout as well as extending to create an interesting custom variation.

  • #45

    Here we continue on with our In App Purchase example, but this time we take the receipt given to us by StoreKit and we send it to our custom rails server to be validated with Apple.

  • #44

    In this episode I dive into the world of IAP (In App Purchases) using StoreKit. I start by creating a product in iTunes Connect, retrieving that product on the device, and emulating the App Store buy confirmation buttons using a handy CocoaPod.

  • #43

    The iOS SDK has numerous ways to play back audio. In this episode we take a look at how to play a local mp3 file using AVAudioPlayer. We add play/pause support, volume, and show the song progress in a UISlider. We finish it off by monitoring the audio levels using a custom view.

  • #42

    We pick up where we left off in Episode 41 and implement a mechanism to automatically detect expired authentication tokens, re-login the user automatically, and retry the original request. This takes a bit of refactoring and use of blocks, but allows for transparent HTTP retries.

  • #41

    Many APIs require some sort of authentication. In this episode, we explore the use of an API that authenticates with a username and password, and returns an authenticated token that has an expiration date. You'll see use of AFNetworking to deal with the request, attaching the authenticated token as an HTTP Header to outgoing requests, as well as the use of SSKeychain to abstract away the lower level Keychain API.

  • #40

    Creating an animated shine effect, similar to what you see on the slide to unlock screen on the iPhone. In this episode, I show how to achieve this effect with CALayers, layer masks, and a CABasicAnimation.

  • #39

    Parsing JSON responses into Objective-C Objects can be tedious. In this episode, we start development on a smart JSON parsing class that can alleviate some of the mundane work usually required for this functionality.

  • #38

    In this episode I create an application to introspect classes to list out methods and instance variables using Objective-C's runtime features. Bonus: Can you spot the memory leak?

  • #37

    In this episode I cover some of the Xcode tips & tricks that help me be effective. I cover many keyboard shortcuts for keeping my hands on the keyboard, as well as a couple of useful plugins for Xcode for Vim key bindings and picking colors.

  • #36

    Using UISearchDisplayController you can quickly add searching behavior to a UITableView. In this episode we start off with a CoreData model of products, displayed in custom UITableViewCells and add search to filter the products in the table.

  • #35

    In this episode I dive into the complex world of auto layout. Autolayout is an important and powerful new layout system in iOS 6, but it definitely takes some practice to understand fully. Even after practicing this episode a few times I ran into a couple of snags, however I hope this intro to Autolayout provides useful.

  • #34

    Now that iOS 6 is out, and the iPhone 5 is only a day away, it is important to update our applications to make sure there are no issues. In this episode, I convert a rudimentary application to support the taller screen of the iPhone 5 and support iOS 6.

  • #33

    We continue our journey into Core Graphics. This week, we'll draw a polygon with a dynamic number of sides, learn how to use CGMutablePathRef, shadows, clipping paths, and a bit of math.

  • #32

    Core Graphics is a complex topic, but can be very handy to create designs without using images, as well as maintaining resolution independence. In this episode I show how to create a couple of simple gradients using Core Graphics.

  • #31

    In this episode, I take an existing app and add the ability to post information to a server, including photo uploads. We report on the progress of the upload and configure AFNetworking to do a proper muliti-part HTTP form post. In addition, I cover how to build a standalone static TableViewController to represent a form using Storyboards.

  • #30

    In this episode I build an app with Parse, a service that provides custom data storage, files, push notifications, a geolocation support.

  • #29

    RubyMotion is a toolkit that allows you to write native iOS applications using Ruby. Normally I'm pretty skeptical of these alternative frameworks, but RubyMotion is actually quite interesting. In this episode I build a small application and talk about the pros & cons of using the toolkit.

  • #28

    In this episode, we'll create a CocoaPod out of the modal picker view component we created in episodes 25 & 26. We'll see how to tag & push our code to a github repository and create a podspec so that others can use this component in their projects.

  • #27

    The latest version of the LLVM compiler supports some excellent new syntax additions to the Objective-C language. In this episode, I cover what the new syntax is, how to use it, and a few caveats to look out for.

  • #26

    In this episode, I continue where I left of in episode 25. I add a nice animation to present & dismiss the picker, as well as a backdrop view that allows you to tap anywhere to cancel.

  • #25

    In this episode, we'll talk about how to extract code from a view controller into a reusable component. We'll create a simple class that combines a UIPickerView with a toolbar for making quick selections from a small list of values. This ran a little long, so it is broken down into 2 parts.