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Bite-sized videos on iOS development.

The iOS landscape is large and changes often. With short, bite-sized videos released on a steady schedule, NSScreencast helps keep you continually up to date.

Up to date with Xcode 12 and iOS 14

We cover the latest and greatest to get you up to speed quickly.

UIKit, SwiftUI, and macOS

In our catalog you'll find a wide variety of topics and UI frameworks.

Swift Language

Increase your knowledge of the Swift language and take advantage of new Swift language features as they are developed.

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Showing episodes 409 - 432 of 538 in total
  • #130

    In this episode we attempt to write a more idiomatic JSON Parsing framework leveraging Swift. To accomplish this we'll lean heavily on Swift's powerful enum features and apply a couple of custom operators to clean up syntax and reduce redundant code.

  • #129

    Parsing JSON (which provides no contracts or type guarantees) can be difficult and tedious in Swift. Many of the problems you are forced to deal with were easier to ignore in Objective-C, but that doesn't mean they weren't present. In this episode we'll take a look at a very manual approach to mapping from a JSON response to a Swift type.

  • #128

    In this episode we take a look at the NSURLSession API from a Swift perspective. We create a class to fetch JSON from an API, and along the way see lazy properties and type aliases.

  • #127

    One of Swift's powerful features is the ability to define custom operators. In this episode we take a look at two examples of custom operators, one for easy regular expression matching, and another for computing the dot product between two vectors.

  • #126

    Continuing on with our Swift exploration, we focus this time on Swift classes. We talk about initializers, inheritance, protocols, type inspection, and more.

  • #125

    In this episode we take a first look at Apple's brand new programming language Swift.

  • #124

    In this episode we delve into the wonderful Objective-C runtime in order to replace method implementations with our own. Using this technique we can add or change behavior to existing classes, which can be extremely useful for Aspect Oriented Programming (logging/benchmarking), or analytics.

  • #123

    In this episode I take a look at a lightweight network library called STHTTPRequst. Specifically I like two features it provides: easy curl logging of outgoing requests, and a test response queue for performing unit tests against canned responses. Whether or not you want to use this library, there are some good things to learn here.

  • #122

    In this episode I cover Facebook's new, shiny animation framework called Pop. With it we explore spring & decay animations that can make your apps feel more alive.

  • #121

    In this episode we continue with our mantle example, this time binding the code to the UI. This involves mapping back to our mantle model for display on the cell, as well as responding to changes using the NSFetchedResultsControllerDelegate protocol.

  • #120

    In this episode we cover a different feature of Mantle, which allows us to serialize our models into Core Data entities. This episode continues where we left off in Episode 116.

  • #119

    In this episode I cover the x-callback-url draft standard, which is an attempt to formalize a way that applications can exchange data back & forth. Using this technique you can have an application expose functionality available to another application. We'll cover parsing URLs to extract out query parameters and how to respond to callbacks in your application.

  • #118

    In this episode we talk about adding support for 1Password when creating your login forms. This is an easy technique that can add a nice touch to your applications if you need to support user login.

  • #117

    In this episode I cover how you can expose your app's functionality through URL schemes. Inter-app communication is something that iOS is somewhat lacking in, but URL schemes can enable some handy integration scenarios.

  • #116

    In this episode we go over a handy little model framework called Mantle. With Mantle we can easily get support for NSCoding, NSCopying, and JSON serialization for our model objects.

  • #115

    In this episode I walk through the process of submitting GiggleTouch to the App Store. Starting with setting the app up to take posed screenshots, requesting certificates, provisioning profiles, and more.

  • #114

    In this episode we add looping background music to the game using AVFoundation and AVAudioPlayer. We then add sound effects using Sprite Kit's SKAction. In order to reduce lag, we preload the audio files so that they play instantaneously. We also implement rate limiting to avoid sound effect overload using SAMRateLimit.

  • #113

    In this episode we continue on building GiggleTouch. This time we improve our random number functions, add a "giggler" node with SKSequence and test on a real device to see what kind of frame rate we get.

  • #112

    In this episode I start recreating an old app for toddlers called Giggletouch. In the video I use SpriteKit to render shapes that are subsequently rotated, scaled, and faded. The shapes are drawn with Sketch and random colors are applied to the shape at runtime.

  • #111

    In this episode we take a look at a couple of new features in Xcode 5.1. The first is creating your own Quick Look representations for custom objects, which can be quite a handy feature for visualizing data (such as images, locations, and paths). The second is a new Autolayout constraint in Interface Builder called "Aspect Ratio" which can further help describe your intent when laying out views with Autolayout.

  • #110

    In this episode we fix the problem of a scroll view blocking touches to a UITableViewCell by forwarding touch events from the scroll view and onto a delegate, which manages the cell's highlighted state properly.

  • #109

    In this episode we add Core Data to our Weight Tracker application, but we lean on a new library called MDMCoreData to set up our Core Data stack for us. Using MDMCoreData we can get a sensible parent/child context set up where the main context is a child of the parent writer context. We also leverage a handy class that dovetails with NSFetchedResultsController to display records in a UITableView.

  • #108

    UIStoryboards can help visualize your screen flow and even describe how to transition between view controllers using segues. In this episode I'll show you how you can take advantage of built-in support to unwind segues to back to where you came from. I'll show the automatic way as well as how to manually unwind a segue.

  • #107

    In this episode I customize UITableViewCell to provide swipe to reveal behavior, similar to Mail.app. We use UIScrollView's delegate methods to ensure that we never land mid-way through the swipe, raise notifications to make sure only one cell is open at a time, and we use a help app called Reveal to assist us in visualizing the view hierarchy.