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Bite-sized videos on iOS development.

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Showing episodes 121 - 144 of 511 in total
  • #391

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    In this episode we start laying out the Podcast Detail screen. We'll start by using an embedded view controller for the header portion, which contains all of the top-level information about the podcast. We'll then see how we can utilize this child view controller to contain all of our outlets and how to pass data from the parent view controller to the child.

  • #390

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    To get the information we need for the Podcast Detail screen, we’ll have to get the feed URL and parse it. There’s no built-in Codable support for XML, so we’ll look at using FeedKit to parse the feeds and extract the relevant information we need.

  • #389

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    In this episode we build another API client to search for podcasts matching a term and customize the UI and behavior of the search bar. We display the recommended podcasts first, then when a user types in a term we show the matching podcasts from the iTunes API.

  • #388

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    In this episode we take the response from the top podcasts feed and decode the JSON into models using Codable.

  • #387

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    It's time to start talking to external APIs to get the data we want to display in the app. We start by exploring the API we want to consume with Paw, a useful macOS app. We then create a simple API client class that abstracts most of the boilerplate logic around how to handle the various URLSession outcomes.

  • #386

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    Working with images from the network is such a common task in iOS development. In this episode we'll cover a useful library called Kingfisher, which gives you a simple API for downloading and caching images from the network. We also look at two ways for configuring our image view, one using User-Defined Runtime Attributes and the other by using awakeFromNib in code.

  • #385

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    In this episode we add our tableview cell styling to match the design, using autolayout to arrange the views and using the Xcode View Debugger to find and fix a visual glitch when using dark background cells.

  • #384

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    In this episode we start building our first table view cells. We then build a protocol to represent Reusable Views, such as UITableViewCells. With this protocol you can supply a simple type reference and the reuse identifier and casting happens for you. Leveraging Swift's protocol extensions allows you to leverage your conventions to write cleaner, safer code.

  • #383

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    We start out by creating our first view controller (Search) by creating some structure to keep things organized by logical function (rather than by subclass) and create a storyboard to hold each tab. The main storyboard then uses Storyboard References to keep things tidy.

  • #382

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    We start from a blank project template, then add our first storyboard and tab bar controller. We also introduce a mechanism for skinning the app with a Theme type.

  • #381

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    We’re kicking off a brand new series on building a podcast app from scratch. Along the way we’ll deal with implementing some custom UI, transitions, networking, local persistence, and of course audio playback.

  • #380

    Designing a Podcast App in Sketch

    In this episode we export the assets used in our Sketch design in a format we can use in an Xcode project. Using the Make Exportable button, we can easily export known sizes or size multiples (like 2x and 3x) and have them output as PNG files.

  • #379

    Designing a Podcast App in Sketch

    In this episode we take a look at the prototyping features of Sketch that allows you to link artboards together with transitions, then preview the app on an mobile-sized window. This can be a valuable tool in your arsenal when working with clients to convey ideas, nail down the navigation and flow of an application, which is something difficult to communicate with static pictures alone.

  • #378

    Designing a Podcast App in Sketch

    In this episode we design the "player bar" which will be a persistent view above the tab bar that we can use to control playback or get back to the play from anywhere else in the app.

  • #377

    Designing a Podcast App in Sketch

    In this episode we design the player screen, and talk about how to create a color system for overriding colors for buttons and other UI elements.

  • #376

    Designing a Podcast App in Sketch

    In this episode we design a Podcast detail screen, that displays the show’s artwork, name, publisher, category, and a list of episode. We also consider what this screen looks like if you’ve already subscribed.

  • #375

    Designing a Podcast App in Sketch

    We continue our design of a Podcast app in Sketch. This time we focus on designing a Search screen, complete with table view cells and keyboards. We'll see how to use masks to round the corners of an image and easily duplicate and offset content.

  • #374

    Designing a Podcast App in Sketch

    In this episode I start designing a new Podcast App. I decided to design it in Sketch first so I could define the look & feel, flow, and data required first. In this episode we start by leveraging Sketch's iOS Design Library, then customize them by creating our own symbols. We end up with a custom themed iOS design that uses a tab bar with custom icons.

  • #373

    Server-side Swift with Vapor

    Taking input from a request body in order to update or create a record is extremely easy with Vapor. In this episode we will update our create and update routes for Projects and take in JSON input from the request in order to modify Projects. We also talk about decoupling the request model from our actual model to prevent updating certain internal attributes from being modified.

  • #372

    Server-side Swift with Vapor

    So far in this series we have been adding all of our routes to the routes.swift file. You can see that this would get unwieldy over time. In this episode we will use RouteCollections to build controllers so that we can organize the routes around the Projects resource. We’ll conform our Project type to the Parameter protocol to make loading models from a route parameter extremely simple, and we will leverage the Content protocol to have the results serialized to JSON automatically.

  • #371

    Server-side Swift with Vapor

    When you have a many-to-many relationship you typically rely on a join table, or what Vapor calls a Pivot table to relate the records together. In this episode we will create a relationship to allow an issue to have many tags, and also allow a tag to apply to many issues. We'll see how we can use Vapor's ModifiablePivot and Sibling types to make working with these relationships easier.

  • #370

    We continue our mini-project to create a Swift script that automatically creates migrations for Vapor projects. In this episode we save the generated templates to disk, render a generated extension so that we can add these migration types to the Vapor service, and see the example running end-to-end.

  • #369

    Server-side Swift with Vapor

    Our Project and Issue models currently aren't connected in any way. In this episode we will add a foreign key to the projects table and add the parent/child relationships the models so that we can query for issues belonging to a project.

  • #368

    Usually I lean on Ruby or Bash for writing command line scripts, but it is becoming increasingly more viable to use Swift for this as well. In the Vapor series, I wanted to write a little script (in Swift) that would generate migration files for me so I wouldn’t have to maintain this myself. For this, I used the Marathon tool, which helps alleviate some of the machinery necessary to use Swift in this way. And what better way to explore this tool than with this author guiding me along. John Sundell joins me in this episode to use Marathon and Swift to write a useful script for Vapor applications. This is a longer episode, so it is split into two parts. Enjoy!