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Bite-sized videos on iOS development.

The iOS landscape is large and changes often. With short, bite-sized videos released on a steady schedule, NSScreencast helps keep you continually up to date.

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Showing episodes 73 - 96 of 505 in total
  • #433

    With SwiftUI views we no longer have view controllers, and this can pose the question: Where does our data access and networking code live? In this episode we will load some data from a movies API in order to examine the ObservableObject protocol.

  • #432

    The Breathe app on watchOS has a really excellent animation. In this episode we attempt to recreate this animation in SwiftUI using offsets, rotation, and scaling, then making the animation repeat forever.

  • #431

    SwiftUI is really fun and easy to work with, but what if you need to work with a view that already exists? This episode covers the UIViewRepresentable protocol and we use it to provide a UIActivityIndicatorView to SwiftUI. The same approach can be used to wrap your own custom UIViews as well.

  • #430

    In this episode we add the ability to provide modal content from outside of the modal view. To do this we can leverage @ViewBuilder which is a type of Function Builder. This is a new Swift feature that gives SwiftUI's syntax a DSL rather than writing out vanilla Swift syntax.

  • #429

    In this episode we look at designing a modal card that takes advantage of ZStack, HStack, VStack and the Spacer helper.

  • #428

    The Keychain is the best place to store sensitive data such as API keys, auth tokens, and login credentials. On device the data is stored encrypted. Once unlocked, you can retrieve the values you saved, keeping the sensitive data secured by the user's passcode, Face ID, or Touch ID. Using the keychain is not very straightforward, however. It has a low-level C-adapted API and is a little cumbersome to work with. In this episode we will look at how to add, query, and remove items from the keychain, then look at a popular open-source library for making storing values in the keychain much easier to implement.

  • #427

    Property wrappers are turning out to be super useful! In this video we'll look at an open-source library called ValidatedPropertyKit, which gives you property wrappers for validating user input. With it you can check for ranges, non-empty strings, regular expressions, or extend it with your own.

  • #426

    Last time we saw the manual approach to parsing XML. While ultra flexible, parsing XML that is extremely tedious. In this episode we will examine a different approach using Codable and a 3rd party library that adds support for XML. We'll see how XML's flexibility adds some increased complexity with how to parse documents, how to control whether properties are encoded/decoded as elements or attributes and how to deal with nested arrays.

  • #425

    Sometimes legacy APIs that we have to deal with only support XML, and while Swift has first class support for JSON with Codable, XML parsing is still done with Foundation's XMLParser. This is a powerful yet difficult to use class that is modeled as a streaming XML parser. This means you have to write some code that keeps track of the values and state of where we are in the XML document in order to parse it. In this episode we will cover how to parse an XML document using multiple objects, parsers, and a delegate stack.

  • #424

    When working with Codable models, everything is great until you deviate even slightly from the normal behavior. Doing so requires you to drop down to a more manual approach where you have to define your own CodingKeys enum and encode/decode methods. In this episode we will look at a 3rd party set of property wrappers that give you some handy Codable functionality for free.

  • #423

    Swift 5.1 introduced a powerful new feature to the language: Property Wrappers. In this video we will take a look at how to write property wrappers and how to use them to simplify code in our apps.

  • #422

    In the last episode we had a bit of an issue... I was trying to store an enum value in UserDefaults, thinking it would automatically use the backing rawValue to store and load the value. Unfortunately this doesn't work. In this episode we fix this issue and extend our solution to also accommodate other data types by leveraging Codable and a custom protocol.

  • #421

    UserDefaults is quite a handy class for storing user user preferences and lightweight data. However the data is keyed by strings and there's no enforcement of any schema or validation of the data you put in it. In this episode we will look at a technique for making strongly typed access to data in UserDefaults so that we can avoid mistakes when typing the key name or the type of data intended to be written to that key.

  • #420

    Now that Swift Package Manager has started to see some adoption and we have some integration inside of Xcode, I think it's time to take a deeper look at how to use it both as a consumer and as a library author. In this episode we'll create a DiceKit library using SwiftPM, then use it in a command line utility.

  • #419

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    To wrap up this series, we add a new model to track and persist the progress of playing episodes. We also restore the player and playback position when coming back from a cold launch.

  • #418

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    In this episode we create the UI for our playlist screen, showing episodes from each of the subscribed podcasts. On this screen we combine NSFetchedResultsController with UITableViewDiffableDatasource so that our playlist screen can react to changes to the underlying data and reload as necessary. We do this using the automaticallyMergesChangesFromParent on our NSManagedObjectContext.

  • #417

    Before Swift 5 we used to write our own Result type to contain a value or an error (but never both). A lot of 3rd party libraries brought along their own as well. Then Swift 5 came and brought us Result. Not only is it slightly different than the ones we might be familiar with, Swift's Result type also has some useful functionality up its sleeve.

  • #416

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    In this episode we update all of the episodes in the background when the application is launched. We leverage Operations to do this work and set the qualityOfService to prefer foreground work that the user is actively requesting.

  • #415

    One of the features of iOS 13 that has not gotten much attention is the new diffable datasources for UITableView and UICollectionView. Using UITableViewDiffableDataSource or UICollectionViewDiffableDataSource along with NSDiffableDataSourceSnapshot you can create safe, animatable changes between two states without having to keep track of which records were added, moved, or deleted. It's seriously great!

  • #414

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    We finish off our operation to import all the episodes given a podcast id and save into the core data store. We also implement a FeedImporter class that listens for new subscriptions in order to kick off the import when a user subscribes.

  • #413

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    Our current SubscriptionStore is too tied to the main core data context. In this episode we'll split this behavior on to a new type that will manage persistence for us, as well as implement a solution to solve the problem of core data being initialized asynchronously. We want to delay our app's UI until we have a context we can use.

  • #412

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    In preparation for us to have a playlist of episodes ready to play in the app, we need to save the episodes to our Core Data store. In this episode we create the Episode model and associated class.

  • #411

    Making a Podcast App From Scratch

    We refactor out some common logic to show a My Podcasts screen with all of the subscribed podcasts. We fetch the subscriptions using Core Data and listen for changes to subscriptions using our new Typed Notification system.

  • #410

    Sending notifications in your apps is a great way to signal events without having tight coupling between the interested parties. However, in practice this means creating notifications using string names, and passing data as an untyped dictionary means there is opportunity for misspellings and misunderstandings in what data will be passed for which notifications. This can lead to bugs and crashes. In this episode we'll look at creating a more Swift-friendly type-safe wrapper around notifications.