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Bite-sized videos on iOS development.

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Showing episodes 25 - 48 of 579 in total
  • Creating Rich Link Previews

    #555

    macOS Mastodon Client

    Posts with links in them can be expanded to show richer information, including an image for many sites that support it. In this episode we'll utilize the LinkPresentation framework to add this to our app. We'll also build out a cache using NSCache to ensure that we respond quickly when rendering the same post while scrolling.

  • ViewThatFits and Remote Images

    #554

    macOS Mastodon Client

    In this episode we continue with our post UI, making it adapt the layout to the available size using the ViewThatFits view in SwiftUI. Then we turn our attention to the avatars, which need to be fetched and displayed. We start with AsyncImage, but after a discussion we conclude that we will need more control over how the images are fetched and cached, so we implement our own RemoteImageView.

  • Mastodon Post UI and HTML Parsing

    #553

    macOS Mastodon Client

    In this episode we tackle showing a list of posts, which requires us to convert the network models into models more fit for the UI, parsing HTML in order to display as an AttributedString, and displaying the author information.

  • Showing the Timeline

    #552

    macOS Mastodon Client

    In this episode we take our authenticated session and use it to fetch the user's timeline on the selected server.

  • Adding OAuth Log in with ASWebAuthentication

    #551

    macOS Mastodon Client

    In this episode we complete our log in functionality using the AuthenticationServices and the keychain. We'll also see how we will represented an authenticated session using a new type, so that other parts of our code will have everything it needs to make authenticated calls to the API.

  • OAuth App Creation and Keychain

    #550

    macOS Mastodon Client

    In this episode we lay the foundation for the OAuth flow with Mastodon servers. We'll utilize KeychainAccess as a wrapper for the Keychain API, so that we can store secrets in a secure way.

  • Instance selection UI and transitions

    #549

    macOS Mastodon Client

    The first step to use Mastodon is to select your instance. You can browse a public timeline of that instance or you can log into that instance to see your own timeline. In this episode we will create a simple instance selection UI. We'll then use animated transitions to switch to the timeline view. Gui teaches us a new tip about debugging animations.

  • Starting a Mastodon Client for macOS from Scratch

    #548

    macOS Mastodon Client

    Gui Rambo joins us to build a Mastodon Client for macOS using SwiftUI. In this episode we'll show the app we'll be building and then start from a blank slate where we will cover some topics about how a SwiftUI macOS app is set up, how we can define some build settings using xcconfig files, and how to deal with building for different Apple Developer teams.

  • Multiple Selection & Inspector

    #547

    SwiftUI on the Mac

    In order to control the font, size, and color of various text elements we need a way to implement selection of one or more text elements. In this episode we will refactor our code to lift up some state into an observable object so that we can control the selected text items from another view outside the canvas.

  • Editing Text

    #546

    SwiftUI on the Mac

    To allow the user to edit the text elements, we'll add a binding for isEditing and swap out the Text element for a TextField. We'll then utilize onSubmit and a tap gesture to go in and out of the edit mode. Finally, using a derived binding, we can ensure that only one field is showing as editable at a given time.

  • Adding & Dragging Text Elements

    #545

    SwiftUI on the Mac

    In this episode we will add a toolbar button to add new text elements. We'll see how to quickly add a stroke around our text to make it readable. Then we'll implement smooth dragging to position the text elements on the canvas.

  • Memeify - Dragging Images

    #544

    SwiftUI on the Mac

    We start with a literal blank canvas. We'll use NSApplicationDelegateAdaptor and NSDocumentController with our SwiftUI app to ensure a new document is always created on launch. Then we'll introduce drag & drop behavior to allow a user to drag an image from the Finder to our app to display it.

  • SwiftUI on the Mac - Document Apps

    #543

    SwiftUI on the Mac

    We start looking at SwiftUI on the Mac. We'll go over how document-based apps work, and see how much functionality and standard behavior we can get with just a few lines of code. This will be the basis for a new app we'll make called Memeify.

  • Managing Secrets with Arkana

    #542

    Storing secrets in plain-text in your source code is not a great idea. It can lead to leaking this information to the wrong people (or to a wider audience than is necessary), it makes rotating these keys difficult, and it makes it trivial for people to see these secrets in your compiled application binary. In this episode we will utilize an obfuscation approach that may just be good enough for many use cases.

  • Migrating to Xcodegen

    #541

    When working on a large project with multiple developers, we often find ourselves in contention with the Xcode project.pbxproj file. Conflicts here are not easy to solve manually, and if you make a mistake Xcode won’t load the project at all, requiring you to fix it manually. In this episode we will explore migrating to a solution where the project file is generated using a tool called Xcodegen.

  • Fixing Persistent Sorting

    #540

    Todo App in SwiftUI

    In this episode we fix an issue that caused our sorting logic to be lost after adding persistence.

  • Adding Persistence with Boutique

    #539

    Todo App in SwiftUI

    Now that we have a working Todo app, it's time to focus on persistence, so that our changes are kept when we launch the app. This will change the structure slightly, as we'll bring in a popular new library called Boutique and its Store to provide this facility. We'll also introduce the concept of a "controller", which is more of a model controller than a controller you might be familiar with in UIKit MVC.

  • Drag to Reorder Todos

    #538

    Todo App in SwiftUI

    In this video we discuss a couple of options for implementing drag to reorder so that we can reorder our todos. We also implement a feature to automatically move completed todos to the bottom, and bringing them back when unchecked.

  • Swipe to Delete

    #537

    Todo App in SwiftUI

    In this episode we'll implement swipe to delete so we can remove todo items.

  • Todo App in SwiftUI - Creating, Editing, and Controlling Focus

    #536

    Todo App in SwiftUI

    In this episode we make the todos editable and implement keyboard avoidance. We create a "new todo" button and then set up programmatic control over focus. Along the way we'll see why choosing a proper Hashable value is important.

  • Todo App in SwiftUI - Fancy Checkbox

    #535

    Todo App in SwiftUI

    In this episode we design a checkbox for our todo UI. We see how we can stroke and fill shapes, how to use InsettableShape, and how to apply a shadow without applying it to every view in the hierarchy.

  • Todo App in SwiftUI - State and Bindings

    #534

    Todo App in SwiftUI

    Kicking off a new series on building a Todo App in SwiftUI. In this episode we focus primarily on the preliminary data structure, deciding who owns this data and when to use State versus Bindings when separating our app into distinct views.

  • Derived Bindings in SwiftUI

    #533

    Bindings are a core concept in SwiftUI. We can easily convert a @State property wrapper to a binding of its value, and we can traverse keypaths to get Bindings of nested values. What if we wanted to transform the values, or update values inside of collections? In this episode we will explore creating map for transforming bindings, unwrap for transforming optional bindings, and take a look at how bindings with collections work under the hood.

  • Property Wrappers - Accessing the Enclosing Instance

    #532

    Property Wrappers are great for encapsulating cross-cutting concerns and simplifying common patterns. However, previously it seemed impossible to access the enclosing instance to enable more advanced and useful behaviors. As it turns out, this was supported all along, just in a not-so-obvious way. Let me show you.