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There are 7 episodes with tag 'swift package manager'   Clear search
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#469
Now that we have some streaming output from the ffmpeg process, we can take this and create a custom progress bar. Since this could useful in other utilities we can create it as a separate Swift package and import it using a local file reference.
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#468
When dealing with long running tasks it would be nice to be able to gather output as the task runs and not hang until the entire process is done. In this episode we will extract some useful information out of ffprobe, so we can get the total number of frames in a video file, and then kick off ffmpeg to encode the video. We'll use the Subprocess package to provide a simpler interface over gathering output from a pipe as it is sent, rather than waiting for the end.
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#466
In this episode we will launch other programs as sub processes and show how to capture its output.
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#465
Working with files and folders with FileManager is cumbersome. Instead we'll lean on the excellent Files package from John Sundell.
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#464
I use a collection of command line scripts that help me in the production of NSScreencast episodes. Most are written in Ruby, which is a language I know and love, and some are written in bash, which is... a language. I sometimes wonder what these scripts would look like if I were to write them in Swift. So in this new series I'm going to explore rewriting a script that I use to encode videos using Swift. In this episode we'll bring in the excellent Swift Argument Parser library and use it to give us a clean and consistent command line interface to start with.
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#460
Managing dependencies can be a pain. Unless you're using shared instances accessible everywhere, you end up having to pass along dependencies from class to class. One strategy for decoupling your types from external dependencies is to create protocols and "inject" the actual concrete implementations at runtime. This enables you to test them easily and also isolates library-specific APIs from the rest of your application. This can make switching between libraries more feasible. In this episode we'll take a look at a library called Resolver that does this. Technically it implements Service Location rather than Dependency Injection, but the result is similar.
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#420
Now that Swift Package Manager has started to see some adoption and we have some integration inside of Xcode, I think it's time to take a deeper look at how to use it both as a consumer and as a library author. In this episode we'll create a DiceKit library using SwiftPM, then use it in a command line utility.