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Showing episodes 25 - 48 of 67 in total
There are 67 episodes with tag 'swiftui'   Clear search
  • Drag to Reorder Todos

    #538

    Todo App in SwiftUI

    In this video we discuss a couple of options for implementing drag to reorder so that we can reorder our todos. We also implement a feature to automatically move completed todos to the bottom, and bringing them back when unchecked.

  • Swipe to Delete

    #537

    Todo App in SwiftUI

    In this episode we'll implement swipe to delete so we can remove todo items.

  • Todo App in SwiftUI - Creating, Editing, and Controlling Focus

    #536

    Todo App in SwiftUI

    In this episode we make the todos editable and implement keyboard avoidance. We create a "new todo" button and then set up programmatic control over focus. Along the way we'll see why choosing a proper Hashable value is important.

  • Todo App in SwiftUI - Fancy Checkbox

    #535

    Todo App in SwiftUI

    In this episode we design a checkbox for our todo UI. We see how we can stroke and fill shapes, how to use InsettableShape, and how to apply a shadow without applying it to every view in the hierarchy.

  • Todo App in SwiftUI - State and Bindings

    #534

    Todo App in SwiftUI

    Kicking off a new series on building a Todo App in SwiftUI. In this episode we focus primarily on the preliminary data structure, deciding who owns this data and when to use State versus Bindings when separating our app into distinct views.

  • Derived Bindings in SwiftUI

    #533

    Bindings are a core concept in SwiftUI. We can easily convert a @State property wrapper to a binding of its value, and we can traverse keypaths to get Bindings of nested values. What if we wanted to transform the values, or update values inside of collections? In this episode we will explore creating map for transforming bindings, unwrap for transforming optional bindings, and take a look at how bindings with collections work under the hood.

  • SwiftUI Escape Hatch

    #531

    Sometimes we run into issues where SwiftUI doesn't quite do what we need. In some cases, SwiftUI views are powered by UIKit under the hood. Wouldn't it be great (and devious) to dig into the underlying UIKit views to customize things when vanilla SwiftUI just won't cut it? In this episode we'll look at a technique for discovering the UIKit underneath SwiftUI views.

  • FocusedValue and FocusedBinding

    #530

    In this episode we will examine FocusedValue and FocusedBinding, which are property wrappers that allow you to react to some state when a nearby field gets focused.

  • Controlling Focus in SwiftUI

    #529

    There are a number of types, propertyWrappers and view modifiers describing "focus" so it is not immediately obvious what they are all for. In this episode we will see how we can control focus for a text field in SwiftUI. We'll see how to use simple Bools as well as your own types to describe which field has focus. Finally we'll touch on a common request that doesn't yet have a great answer: setting focus in onAppear.

  • Wurdle Part 7 - Final Touches

    #525

    Building a Wordle Clone in SwiftUI

    We now have all the pieces in place to make this game playable. We'll choose a random word, and then move on to detecting won/lost games and provide the ability to restart and keep playing.

  • Wurdle Part 6 - Letter Flip

    #524

    Building a Wordle Clone in SwiftUI

    In this episode we create a custom transition using a GeometryEffect to add a nice flip animation for the letters as they are revealed.

  • Wurdle Part 5 - Coloring the Letters

    #523

    Building a Wordle Clone in SwiftUI

    Now that we have some information associated with each of our typed characters, we can use that to color each letter according to its status.

  • Wurdle Part 4 - Enriching the model

    #522

    Building a Wordle Clone in SwiftUI

    This time we'll focus on moving on from a simple string to a data structure that can capture the status of each guessed letter.

  • Wurdle Part 3 - Handling guesses and the enter key

    #521

    Building a Wordle Clone in SwiftUI

    In this episode we will handle the enter key and migrate our state to contain an array of guesses. We will then refactor to an observable object to better encapsulate state changes and to enable testability.

  • Typed Letter Animation

    #520

    Building a Wordle Clone in SwiftUI

    Let's make the letters bounce a little as they are being typed. To do this we'll have to see how animated state changes are performed and how we can restructure our view hierarchy to achieve the results we're after.

  • Wurdle Part 1 - Letter Grid and Text Input

    #519

    Building a Wordle Clone in SwiftUI

    In this episode we'll design a letter grid and build up text input using a hidden textfield, displaying the typed letters in our own UI.

  • SwiftUI Previews for UIKit

    #473

    Layout in Code

    In this episode we will see how we can leverage SwiftUI's live previews even if we aren't using SwiftUI and even if our deployment target is less than iOS 13! We'll cover previewing our view controllers and using that to give us rapid feedback on our layout as we work.

  • Data Fetching and Caching with Pigeon

    #463

    Pigeon is an interesting and powerful library for SwiftUI and UIKit for fetching and caching data. In this episode we will explore the library and how we can use it to build a simple Star Wars Universe explorer app using the Star Wars Dev API.

  • Customizing Animations with AnimatableVector

    #449

    If you can describe your animation with a small number of parameters that interpolate over the animation, animation is pretty easy. But once you want to combine an arbitrary number of animatable data values, for instance an array of Doubles representing our points, then you have to resort to a custom VectorArithmetic implementation. In this episode we will create an AnimatableVector type that is capable of animating between arrays of Double values. We then use this type to animate between 2 sets of points using our waveform algorithm.

  • Animatable Modifiers

    #448

    Animating in SwiftUI can seem like magic, until you want to animate something custom. In this episode we'll add animation to our frequency, amplitude, and phase parameters for our waveform by leveraging SwiftUI's AnimatableModifier protocol. We'll see how to implement the animatableData property with one, two, and ultimately all three parameters. We'll cover implicit and explicit animations, as well as the behavior when attempting to mix animations.

  • Rendering Waveforms in SwiftUI

    #447

    I've been working on rendering waveforms using mathematical functions and have found the experience to be both fun and enlightening. In this episode we will develop a method to render arbitrary functions using a Shape, then explore some mathematical concepts that can help us render a nice looking waveform that could be use to indicate activity in sound, speech, or other effects.

  • Bounce Animation in SwiftUI

    #446

    Simple animations in SwiftUI are refreshingly easy. However, some animations are deceptively tricky, as we don't have access to completion handlers. Animation is entirely state-based, so if we have an animation where an item needs to move and return to its original state, we need to take a different approach. In this episode we will model a bounce animation using a simple sine function, feeding in the time value t using SwiftUI's linear animation interpolation.

  • SwiftUI Grids

    #445

    With the introduction of LazyVGrid and LazyHGrid In iOS 14 we now have access to much more powerful grid-based layouts in SwiftUI. In this episode We will examine the different types of layouts we can accomplish with flexible, fixed, and adaptive sizing for our rows and columns. We'll look at how animations work between different layouts, and how to consider larger screen sizes.

  • SwiftUI Native Progress Views

    #444

    A few episodes back we covered how to wrap a UIActivityIndicatorView to show loading progress in SwiftUI. Now in iOS 14 this is built in. In this episode we'll cover the various styles, how to hook it up to a Progress instance, and how to create your own custom progress visualizations.