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Displaying Episode 73 - 96 of 299 in total
#227
227 lets build activity plus plus part 5
Continuing our series on building out our Activity++ clone, this time we hook up our application to HealthKit, displaying real data in the app from a device. We continue to use our wrapper type so that the application can still work in the simulator with randomized data, which also allows us to set up certain scenarios that we wish to test, such as streaks.
#226
226 lets build activity plus plus part 4
In this episode we examine the scrolling performance of our activity ring views. We see that framerate suffers when scrolling quickly, then apply a few changes to bring scrolling performance back to 60 frames per second.
#225
225 lets build activity plus plus part 3
This week we take our ring views and use them to create a collection view of rings, one for each day in an entire year.
#224
224 lets build activity plus plus part 2
Continuing in our quest to create the interface behind Activity++, this time we introduce a randomize button, proper theme colors, labels for the rings, and highlighting when the goal for each ring has been met.
#223
223 lets create activity plus plus
Let‘s attempt to recreate Activity++, an application by _David Smith. The app features a number of interesting interface elements that would be interesting to try to build ourselves! In this part we'll start out by replicating the ring views for a given day.
#222
222 easy auth part 3
In this episode we wrap up the Easy Auth series building the tvOS application to use our API. We'll create an authentication client and discuss how to pass around a set of values to and from the API, as well as polling for status.
#221
221 easy auth part 2
This time we take a look at how to improve security by not transmitting the user's auth token directly. Instead, we'll leverage HMAC SHA1 hashing with the provided client id. Doing this makes the response not directly useful. The client needs to use the client id and the agreed upon hashing algorithm to arrive at the common auth token.
#220
220 easy auth part 1
Typing a username and password on the Apple TV is cumbersome and annoying. For the NSScreencast TV app, I decided to implement a code-based authentication where you can easily log in on another device, type in the code, and have the device be logged in automatically. In this episode we'll go over how to implement this, starting with the server. This episode is done entirely in Ruby using the Sinatra web application framework, but the technique is applicable to any server side technology (including Swift!).
#219
219 nscalendar
NSCalendar is a class that is easy to dismiss as standard, but is packed full of really useful functions. In this episode I talk about how I solved a problem using NSDateComponents, then came back and solved it in a much cleaner way using new methods on NSCalendar.
#218
218 core data with swift
In this episode we continue our work on the Apple TV app for NSScreencast by adding a local cache of data we receive from the API. Doing so will allow us to have content immediately on launch without waiting for the network, and will also support client-side searching and filtering. Here we talk about how to set up Core Data with Swift and write a few quick tests using an in-memory store to verify that things are working.
#217
217 text attachments
In this episode Sam shows us how to mix rich content such as images into a text view. Using Text attachments we can flow text around an image, select the image and delete or replace it, and more. Sam shows how to respond to layout changes and some advice on performance. Text Attachments are not for the faint of heart!
#216
216 swift web frameworks
Running Swift on Linux is intriguing because it allows us to create web applications with Swift and host them on an inexpensive Linux VPS. In this episode we'll use Vagrant to create an Ubuntu virtual machine, install a working version of the Swift development snapshot, and write a tiny web application, complete with routing, parameter extraction, template rendering with Stencil, and JSON parsing. You'll learn about Swift Build, specifying version dependencies, and where to look for the source code.
#215
215 custom dragging with collectionview
In this episode we add a custom drag behavior to reorder collection view cells. UICollectionViewController gives us some of this behavior, but to add transforms, shadows, and animation we'll have to implement our own.
#214
214 swift on linux
In this episode we talk a look at the cool new world of open source Swift! We'll use vagrant to spin up a Linux virtual machine, then install the latest Swift development snapshot and talk about running the Swift REPL and compiling programs on Linux. Using the latest development snapshot is not without its troubles, however, so you'll see how best to report bugs and/or look for workarounds. Enjoy!
#213
213 icon badging with fastlane
When doing release builds it is handy to automatically update the build number so we always have a unique version for reporting bugs. However it is not easy for testers to always know which version they are testing. In this episode we'll look at how to set up versioning for our project, automatically increment the versions number for release builds, and badge our application's icon so it is easy to see which version of the app you have installed.
#212
212 fastlane
In this episode we set up fastlane to automate a lot of the tedious tasks related to building and deploying iOS applications. We use it to create our bundle identifier, create certificates and provisioning profiles, build and test our app, take screenshots on multiple devices, and submit to TestFlight.
#211
211 indenting text with text kit
Sam joins us again to cover how to change text layout dynamically as you type. He will implement a feature common in Markdown editors where typing dash followed by a space indents the list. In the process you'll learn about more of the Text Kit API. If you've ever wondered what type of work goes into building a text editor, this episode is for you!
#210
210 cool text effects 2
Continuing on from last time, we take our glyph layers and apply Core Animation, providing for some interesting effects including animating the stroke of each glyph path and applying a typing effect with transforms.
#209
209 cool text effects
In this episode we dive deeper into the text system, leveraging CoreText to compute exact metrics about each glyph in a string. We can use this information to do interesting things with text. There's a lot of code in this one, but you'll learn the basic foundations of text, how CoreText works, and how to extract metrics and paths from your rendered text. We'll use this in a future episode to implement some interesting effects!
#208
208 syntax highlighting with textkit
In this episode Sam Soffes joins us again to show how to implement some rudimentary syntax highlighting of text while you type using TextKit. This builds on the concepts we learned in episode 207, so start there first!
#207
207 intro to text kit
In this episode Sam Soffes walks us through the basic components of TextKit, a framework that allows complete control over the text layout and rendering system on iOS and OS X. TextKit is a complex topic, but with it brings a lot of power. This episode will cover the basics that we can build upon in future episodes.
#206
206 more tableview customization
In this episode we continue with our Starcraft II Guide application, this time focusing on using a table view to edit a model. We leverage a cell with a text field, a cell to select data from another view controller, and a section that is only editable/reorderable with itself.
#205
205 tableview customization
In this episode I take a stock UITableView and UINavigationController and customize their appearance to match a design for a Starcraft II companion app. We'll leverage Swift enums to capture colors & fonts so we can reuse them in multiple places. We will also utilize the UIAppearance API to style all instances of a UINavigationBar, and get rid of UITableViewCell's default separator indentation.
#204
204 json api client part 2
In this episode we start writing an application-specific API Client. We use Argo to decode our JSON response into an Episode model, including some nested object decoding, date formatting, and wrap it up by testing the implementation to make sure it works.